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2016 Home of the Year

This 6,700-square-foot home sits on a gentle rise on a secluded 2.5-acre lot in Cherry Hills Village. It’s our Home of the Year for a multitude of reasons: its remarkable architecture, its strong lines and calming spaces, the fact that it generates more energy than it uses and finally, the way it frames and celebrates classic Colorado mountain views.  (Courtesy of Colorado Homes & Lifestyles)

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The multi-level roofs are a part of Ojala’s passive solar design. “I designed the roof overhangs calculating the altitude of the sun through the year, so in the autumn equinox the sun will slowly enter the house, warming the space, and in the spring it will slowly leave the house, keeping the home cooler.” The green piece was important to the homeowners . The husband researched solar energy systems and a solar panel system was added to the roof,  making for an electricity bill as enviable as the space. "The home is 120 percent powered by solar," he says. “We’ve never had an electricity bill, and in the summer, our account is negative a few hundred dollars.”

The multi-level roofs are a part of Ojala’s passive solar design. “I designed the roof overhangs calculating the altitude of the sun through the year, so in the autumn equinox the sun will slowly enter the house, warming the space, and in the spring it will slowly leave the house, keeping the home cooler.” The green piece was important to the homeowners . The husband researched solar energy systems and a solar panel system was added to the roof, making for an electricity bill as enviable as the space. “The home is 120 percent powered by solar,” he says. “We’ve never had an electricity bill, and in the summer, our account is negative a few hundred dollars.”

 

The mellow tones of the applewood island and the richness of the subtly metallic floor tile from Porcelanosa warm the modern kitchen. To keep the well-used space looking sleek and uncluttered there’s a serparate “scullery” for daily appliances and food storage. Dining table pendant lights are LBL from the Lighting Studio.

The mellow tones of the applewood island and the richness of the subtly metallic floor tile from Porcelanosa warm the modern kitchen. To keep the well-used space looking sleek and uncluttered there’s a serparate “scullery” for daily appliances and food storage. Dining table pendant lights are LBL from the Lighting Studio.

 

Designer Cindy McCoy is very proud of the living room fireplace façade. She was the first Coloradan to import these Neolith slabs from Spain through The Stone Collection.

Designer Cindy McCoy is very proud of the living room fireplace façade. She was the first Coloradan to import these Neolith slabs from Spain through The Stone Collection.

 

The first-floor hallway leads to a large hidden mudroom.  The geometric painting is Quantum Zone by Colorado artist Clark Richert.

The first-floor hallway leads to a large hidden mudroom. The geometric painting is Quantum Zone by Colorado artist Clark Richert.

 

The master's Zen is watched over by a World Market buddha. The hide bench is from Bernhardt Design and the textured  bathroom wall tile is Ona Natural from Porcelanosa.

The master’s Zen is watched over by a World Market buddha. The hide bench is from Bernhardt Design and the textured bathroom wall tile is Ona Natural from Porcelanosa.

 

The formal dining room lights came with the owners—a previous gift from husband to wife. The table is Room & Board and the abstract artwork above the fireplace is by Koen Lybaert.

The formal dining room lights came with the owners—a previous gift from husband to wife. The table is Room & Board and the abstract artwork above the fireplace is by Koen Lybaert.

 

“Our on-site landscapers, Guerrero Marquez and Juan Chavez, came from Mexico and there was a language barrier,” says the homeowner, "but I would show them images of things I liked and we had this kind of mind-meld thing. I would leave in the morning knowing I’d come home from work and it would be perfect. They were just brilliant.”

“Our on-site landscapers, Guerrero Marquez and Juan Chavez, came from Mexico and there was a language barrier,” says the homeowner, “but I would show them images of things I liked and we had this kind of mind-meld thing. I would leave in the morning knowing I’d come home from work and it would be perfect. They were just brilliant.”

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